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The WILD Network

The WILD Network brings together  stakeholders in the social change sector – investors, donors, social fellowship programs and the female leaders and innovators themselves. Together, in convenings like the one we held as part of Skoll Week in Oxford, England this past April (2018), and the first-ever Forum to Advance Women's Leadership in the International Development Sector held in Washington DC in June (2018), we’ll identify the skills that women can develop to lead more effectively within their organizations, as well as ways in which the organizations can become more alert to the advantages of strong female leadership. Step one: bring the key actors together to share their expertise and experience. Step two: collect that data and packaging it in the most useful forms, for instance, in journal articles or short modules that can be fed back into the social change ecosystem, creating momentum for positive change.

That describes WILD’s mission at a systems level. We’re also passionate about the individual woman and how she can commit herself to making the world a better place without burning out and without getting drowned out by louder voices within her organization (yes, usually male). By bringing together female leaders, both emerging and seasoned, to share their stories, we’ll effectively be mentoring and coaching ourselves. The lessons that have been frequently refined in the corporate world are the same ones most of us need to master to be effective in the social change sector: taking credit for our own achievements, learning to delegate, not being trapped by the desire to please or be perfect at all costs. And more. If our work becomes a joyless grind, we’ve missed the boat.


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Fiona M. Macaulay
Founder & CEO, WILD Network

Fiona Macaulay is one of the pioneering voices in the fields of social entrepreneurship and international development, committed to helping other women make their mark in the social change sector. In the academic world, she’s an Entrepreneur-in-Residence at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business, a Senior Fellow at Beeck Center for Social Impact + Innovation, and she provides executive leadership coaching for female MBAs at Dartmouth College’s Tuck School of Business.

Fiona learned social entrepreneurship from the ground up when in 1999, at age of 26, she founded Making Cents International, a for-profit social enterprise committed to creating more economic opportunities for women and youth that supported partners across 100+ countries. In 2007, she founded, and for a decade led, the Youth Economic Opportunities Network. She scaled it to be the world’s largest, sustained network of stakeholders working on youth workforce development, financial inclusion and enterprise creation. Credited with playing a leading role in professionalizing the youth development sector, she raised the bar on performance and cooperation among donors, service providers, government and private sector companies to serve the world's 1.5 billion young people. 

Fiona successfully exited these two social ventures in 2016. At that time, she was one of part of the 1% of U.S. women business owners to scale her business to this size. Since then, her focus has been on supporting other women leaders and innovators, in partnership with major academic, government, private sector and civil society institutions. In addition to her work at Georgetown and Dartmouth, she mentors female early-stage social entrepreneurs for the Halcyon Incubator, helping to equip them with the tools they need to transform ideas into scalable and sustainable ventures. Always learning, Fiona’s emphasis is on developing mastery of critical skills, staying connected with a personal vision and finding a sustainable, and even joyful, work-life balance. She was selected by Marshall Goldsmith to be part of the elite MG100 cohort of global leaders in leadership change.

Fiona is a Tedx speaker and her work has been featured in the New York Times. She writes and speaks about global trends in economic development.